What a rare combination of average and power that allows a hitter to bat .350 while knocking 30+ home runs! While this feat has been accomplished 10 times since 2000, it only came once from a player not playing at Coors Field or dogged by allegations of steroid use. Stumped? It was Moises Alou back in 2000, when he barely made the club, knocking 30 home runs while batting .355.

An indication of this achievement’s rarity is illustrated by the number of times it occurred between 1962 and 1993–just once: Don Mattingly’s 1986 season where he hit .352 with 31 homers, like Alou just barely making the club.

Given the rarity of .350/30, you may be surprised to learn that it once happened five times in a single season, with four of the hitters playing in the same city. That year was 1929, and the city was Philadelphia.

1934 Goudey card of Jimmie Foxx
1934 Goudey card of Jimmie Foxx

The first baseman for the Philadelpha Athletics was Jimmie Foxx, nicknamed the Beast, one of the game’s all-time greatest power hitters. In just his second full season and at the age of 21, Foxx batted .354 with 33 home runs and a .463 on-base percentage. His 1929 was perhaps the least impressive of the five men.

Teaming with Foxx at Shibe Park was leftfielder Al Simmons. Bucketfoot Al, as he was known, hit .365 that year with 34 home runs and led the AL in RBIs with 157. While the AL handed out no official MVP trophy that year, Simmons was named the league’s top player by The Sporting News.

Meanwhile, across the tracks at the nearby Baker Bowl, the Phillies had a couple impressive bats in their lineup. Rightfielder Chuck Klein, in only his first full season, batted .356 with a league leading 43 roundtrippers, finishing 11th in the NL MVP voting. While it’s hard to fathom these days, Klein’s 43 home runs established a new single season record for the National League, though the record would last under a year!

1933 Goudey card of Lefty O'Doul
1933 Goudey card of Lefty O’Doul

And finally, the fourth Philadelphia phenom was Klein’s mate in the Phillie outfield, leftfielder Frank “Lefty” O’Doul. The runner-up in the NL MVP race, O’Doul led the lead in batting at .398, set an NL record for hits that still stands today with 254, and swatted 32 home runs. It was the first of O’Doul’s two seasons with the Phillies, who couldn’t possibly complain about his stint there. Over the two years, he batted .391, slugged .614, and had an on-base percentage of .460!

As to who the fifth member of 1929’s .350/30 club was, it was none other than Cubbies second baseman Rogers Hornsby, MVP of the National League. Besides hitting .380 with 39 home runs, the Rajah scored 156 runs, batted in 149, and slugged a league best .679.

To put these achievements in perspective, it’s worth looking at just how many times the .350/30 mark has been reached throughout the history of Major League Baseball. While that makes for a lot of data to look through, there’s no need to search before 1920 since no player–regardless of batting average–reached 30 home runs to that point. Well, it took me a few hours, but here is the comprehensive list, sorted by year: 58 instances in all. Players suspected of steroid use are indicated in red, and Coors Field hitters are shown in purple, in case the reader wishes to judge them differently from the other players on the list.

THE .350/30 CLUB – GRAPH

This graph shows a very uneven distribution of .350/30 seasons across baseball history.  The only times we see three or more players in the same year are 1929-30, well known for all kinds of ridiculous batting stats, and the (take your pick) Bud Selig-ARod-PED era.

graph

THE .350/30 CLUB – CHART

Here is some detail on who the players are. I don’t take the list too seriously after 1986, but I will leave the asterisks to the reader to decide.

Player BA HR Year
Babe Ruth 0.376 54 1920
Babe Ruth 0.378 59 1921
Rogers Hornsby 0.401 42 1922
Babe Ruth 0.393 41 1923
Babe Ruth 0.378 46 1924
Rogers Hornsby 0.403 39 1925
Babe Ruth 0.372 47 1926
Babe Ruth 0.356 60 1927
Lou Gehrig 0.373 47 1927
Chuck Klein 0.356 43 1929
Rogers Hornsby 0.380 39 1929
Al Simmons 0.365 34 1929
Jimmie Foxx 0.354 33 1929
Lefty O’Doul 0.398 32 1929
Hack Wilson 0.356 56 1930
Babe Ruth 0.359 49 1930
Lou Gehrig 0.379 41 1930
Chuck Klein 0.386 40 1930
Al Simmons 0.381 36 1930
Babe Herman 0.393 35 1930
Babe Ruth 0.373 46 1931
Jimmie Foxx 0.364 58 1932
Jimmie Foxx 0.356 48 1933
Lou Gehrig 0.363 49 1934
Lou Gehrig 0.354 49 1936
Lou Gehrig 0.352 37 1937
Joe Medwick 0.374 31 1937
Jimmie Foxx 0.360 35 1939
Joe DiMaggio 0.381 30 1939
Joe DiMaggio 0.352 31 1940
Ted Williams 0.406 37 1941
Joe DiMaggio 0.357 30 1941
Ted Williams 0.356 36 1942
Stan Musial 0.376 39 1948
Stan Musial 0.355 32 1951
Mickey Mantle 0.353 52 1956
Ted Williams 0.388 38 1957
Mickey Mantle 0.365 34 1957
Hank Aaron 0.355 39 1959
Norm Cash 0.361 41 1961
Don Mattingly 0.352 31 1986
Jeff Bagwell 0.368 39 1994
Frank Thomas 0.353 38 1994
Albert Belle 0.357 36 1994
Alex Rodriguez 0.358 36 1996
Larry Walker 0.366 49 1997
Mike Piazza 0.362 40 1997
Larry Walker 0.379 37 1999
Todd Helton 0.372 42 2000
Manny Ramirez 0.351 38 2000
Moises Alou 0.355 30 2000
Larry Walker 0.350 38 2001
Barry Bonds 0.370 46 2002
Albert Pujols 0.359 43 2003
Todd Helton 0.359 33 2003
Barry Bonds 0.362 45 2004
Albert Pujols 0.357 37 2008
Josh Hamilton 0.359 32 2010

Ignoring the red and purple players, there were six players who accomplished the feat three or more times, and they make up a who’s who list of some of the greatest sluggers ever to play the game:

  • Babe Ruth (8)
  • Lou Gehrig (5)
  • Jimmie Foxx (4)
  • Rogers Hornsby (3)
  • Joe DiMaggio (3)
  • Ted Williams (3)

And for readers who find the .350/30 club not selective enough (!), here are some related clubs with stricter admittance criteria:

THE .375/30 CLUB (with .400/30 members shown in bold)

Player BA HR Year
Babe Ruth 0.376 54 1920
Babe Ruth 0.378 59 1921
Rogers Hornsby 0.401 42 1922
Babe Ruth 0.393 41 1923
Babe Ruth 0.378 46 1924
Rogers Hornsby 0.403 39 1925
Lefty O’Doul 0.398 32 1929
Rogers Hornsby 0.380 39 1929
Babe Herman 0.393 35 1930
Chuck Klein 0.386 40 1930
Al Simmons 0.381 36 1930
Lou Gehrig 0.379 41 1930
Joe DiMaggio 0.381 30 1939
Ted Williams 0.406 37 1941
Stan Musial 0.376 39 1948
Ted Williams 0.388 38 1957
Larry Walker 0.379 37 1999

Post-steroids era, there are very few lists one can still make involving power-hitting that don’t feel tainted. However, this last one manages to succeed. So where a number of early claims around steroid use (e.g., “steroids won’t help you hit a baseball) appear to have been debunked, perhaps one can truly say that steroids won’t help you hit .375 with 30 home runs. Only Coors Field can do that!

1933 Goudey card of Hack Wilson
1933 Goudey card of Hack Wilson

Meanwhile, here’s an even more exclusive club, one that really illustrates just what a special player Mickey Mantle was in his prime. It’s been more than 50 years since a player joined the .350/50 club, and it may well be another 50 years before we see another. Of course, Larry Walker (.366 BA, 49 HR, 1997) might rightly point out that had he played some of his road games at Coors like his NL opponents were able to, he darn well would have made the list!

 THE .350/50 CLUB

Player BA HR Year
Babe Ruth 0.376 54 1920
Babe Ruth 0.378 59 1921
Babe Ruth 0.356 60 1927
Hack Wilson 0.356 56 1930
Jimmie Foxx 0.364 58 1932
Mickey Mantle 0.353 52 1956
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